» Laboratory

The Carpol Testing Laboratory was established in 2013 as an independent and autonomous organisational unit of Carpol Sp. z o.o. Our qualified staff operate modern, specialised measuring equipment and machines designed specifically for this purpose, and offer services at the highest level in compliance with vehicle regulations.

The Carpol Testing Laboratory possesses accreditation No AB 1607 from the Polish Accreditation Centre as of 2016.


The laboratory specialises in mechanical safety testing of vehicle chassis elements such as:

  • Seatbelt anchor points (UNECE Regulation No 14)
  • Vehicle seats, seat mount brackets and headrests (UNECE Regulation No 17)
  • Barriers separating vehicle cargo and passenger compartments (ISO 27956:2009)
  • Load restraint anchor points (ISO 27956:2009)


Seatbelt anchor point safety testing

Pursuant to the Act on Vehicle Traffic and Directive 2007/46/EC, seatbelt anchor points must comply with UNECE Regulation No 14.

Safety testing of seatbelt anchor points pursuant to UNECE Regulation No 14 is conducted on the vehicle construction or on a completed and ready vehicle and involves:

  • Checking the proper location and number of anchor points
  • Testing anchor point tensile force resilience

The resilience of seatbelt anchor points is tested using a static test imitating forces acting on anchor points during an accident. The forces are applied at an angle of 10 ±5° using specialised traction devices for the belt’s chest and pelvic anchors or solely the pelvic anchor in the case of two-point lap belts.

Test results are deemed to have passed if the anchor points are located in compliance with regulatory guidelines, the respective force is maintained for at least 0.2 seconds, and the effective upper anchoring of the seatbelt does not shift in excess of the allowed specification.


Vehicle seat, mount bracket and headrest safety testing

Vehicle seats, mount brackets and headrests, pursuant to the Act on Vehicle Traffic and Directive 2007/46/EC must comply with UNECE Regulation No 17.

Testing vehicle seats, their mount brackets and headrests pursuant to UNECE Regulation No 17 involves:

  • Checking headrest height, material hardness and verifying the absence of unsafe edges
  • Testing the resilience of the backrest and its regulation mechanism
  • Applied headrest testing
  • Backrest and headrest energy-dissipation tests

Backrest and regulation mechanism resilience testing

The resilience of the backrest and its regulation mechanism is tested by applying lengthwise force against the upper portion of the seat backrest frame.

Test results are deemed to have passed if the seat (or bench) construction is not damaged as a result of testing. Permanent damage (including cracks) is allowed provided such does not increase the risk of passenger injury in the course of impact. Moving mechanisms that facilitate user access must, in the course of testing, function properly at least once and result in the moving of the respective seat element.


Applied headrest safety testing

A headrest is tested by applying a force in the direction of the upper portion of the seat backrest.

This is followed by applying a dummy head model to the headrest with a force of 373 Nm at point R.

Test results are deemed to have passed if the seat or backrest construction is not damaged during testing or if any resulting damage will not decrease passenger safety, while the spherical skull did not shift more than the allowable amount.


Backrest and headrest energy-dissipation safety testing

Energy dissipation testing of the backrest and headrest involves impacting at the correct angle of defined contact points with a model head pendulum (spherical skull) at a velocity of 24.1 km/h.

Backrest and headrest energy-dissipation results are deemed passing if deceleration does not exceed 80 g, in a constant manner, for more than 3 ms. Further, no hazardous edges may form in the course of testing.


Cargo and passenger compartment separation barrier safety testing

Testing of barriers separating vehicle cargo and passenger compartments is conducted pursuant to ISO 27956:2009 standards on the vehicle construction and involve:

  • Measuring the distance between the barrier and vehicle body
  • Measuring the mesh size, if such is used in the barrier design
  • Barrier resilience testing

Barrier resilience testing is performed by impacting the barrier surface with a large and small stamp with a force imitating a load shifting onto the barrier in the event of an accident or sudden braking. The force used in the testing depends on the vehicle’s maximum load capacity.

A barrier resilience test is deemed passing if the permanent barrier deformations arising in the course of testing have no sharp edges or other deformations that may directly harm individuals inside the vehicle; in addition, the mesh size and the distance of the barrier from the vehicle body must not exceed required norms.


Safety testing of load restraint anchor points

Testing of load restraint anchor points pursuant to ISO 27956:2009 is conducted on the vehicle construction and involves:

  • Checking the number of location of load restraint anchor points
  • Checking the geometry of the load-restraint anchor point lashing link
  • Testing the resilience of load restraint anchor points

Load restraint resilience is tested by applying a force imitating a shifting load to the load-restraint points, where force strength depends on the vehicle’s maximum load capacity:

Tests are deemed passing if permanent deformation of lashing links measured during testing does not exceed 12 mm, as well as if the link remains operational (useful) after the final testing phase and if the vehicle possesses the proper number of loads distributed in accordance with standards.

 

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